RISK OF DYING OF COVID-19 IN THE USA, STRATIFIED BY AGE (DATA FROM THE CDC)

The table below is from the CDC website and shows risk of dying of COVID-19 in the USA, stratified by age (1). Know your risks & take precautions, including getting a vaccine if you are in a vulnerable population.
Older age seems to be the highest risk factor but other risk factors include OBESITY, diabetes, heart disease, and more.

Around 400 children in the last 1.5 years have died from COVID-19. According to a recent Nature article, almost all, if not all of these deaths were in high risk individuals, who had underlying conditions. See the article below for more details (2).

Children are still in a very low risk category for death and serious COVID-19 disease. As deaths of children have not increased substantially in the last month, this appears to hold true for the Delta variant also. Healthy, normal young adults also seem to be protected from severe COVID – excluding high risk individuals.
Know your risks and act accordingly.
If you or a family member(s) have issues with weight (which I also personally struggle with), please consider more exercise and weight reduction. This is one super healthy way to lower your risk factors.
Another way that may reduce risk is to make sure you getting enough vitamin D3. Overall, 41% of Americans are deficient (3). If you don’t want to over supplement, a simple blood test can determine your levels. Certain groups are more prone to deficiency. According to a 2012 study, these high risks groups include “blacks (82.1%), followed by Hispanics (69.2%)”. Vitamin D deficiency was significantly more common among those who had no college education, were obese, with a poor health status, hypertension, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, or not consuming milk daily (all P < .001)” (3). Vitamin D status was inversely associated with mortality in a 2015 retrospective study, This association with defiency was linked to mortality relating to digestive disease, endocrine, metabolic and nutritional diseases, and respiratory disease (4). If you are deficient in D3, supplementing with this vitamin is just a healthy thing to do.
A caveat: there is insufficient evidence to support using vitamin D3 for hospitalized COVID-19 patients, and there have been no studies showing vitamin D3 status prior to COVID-19 infection will change the severity or course of disease.

References:

(1) CDC webpage with this table:
https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/Provisional-COVID-19-Deaths-Focus-on-Ages-0-18-Yea/nr4s-juj3

(2) Deaths from COVID ‘incredibly rare’ among children Studies find that overall risk of death or severe disease from COVID-19 is very low in kids. Nature. 15 July 2021

(3) Prevalence and correlates of vitamin D deficiency in US adults. Nutr Res 2011 Jan;31(1):48-54. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2010.12.001.

(4) The relationship of vitamin D status to risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Dan Med J 2015 Feb;62(2):B5008.

By Jill Malone Via https://www.rwmalonemd.com/news/txfwcjxhy6tkwpzzy46zatt4r2a6lr