German Study Finds Lockdown ‘Had No Effect’ on Stopping Spread of Coronavirus

A major new study by German scientists at Munich University has found that lockdowns had no effect on reducing the country’s coronavirus infection rate.

Oh.

“Statisticians at Munich University found “no direct connection” between the German lockdown and falling infection rates in the country,” reports the Telegraph.

The study found that, on all three occasions before Germany imposed its lockdowns in November, December and April, infection rates had already begun to fall.

The R rate – the number that indicates how many other people an infected person passes the virus to – was already under 1 before the lockdown restrictions came into force.

As we highlighted last year, a leaked study from inside the German Ministry of the Interior revealed that the impact of the country’s lockdown could end up killing more people than the coronavirus due to victims of other serious illnesses not receiving treatment.

This is by no means the only study to have concluded that lockdowns are completely useless and don’t work.

A peer reviewed study published in January by Stanford researchers found that mandatory lockdowns do not provide more benefits to stopping the spread of COVID-19 than voluntary measures such as social distancing.

Back in March, Stanford medical professor Dr. Jay Bhattacharya told Newsweek that COVID-19 lockdowns are “the single worst public health mistake in the last 100 years.”

Earlier this year, academics from Duke, Harvard, and Johns Hopkins concluded that there could be around a million excess deaths over the next two decades as a result of lockdowns.

Other research has concluded lockdowns will conservatively “destroy at least seven times more years of human life” than they save.

Via https://summit.news/2021/06/04/german-study-finds-lockdown-had-no-effect-on-stopping-spread-of-coronavirus/