Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Japan – statistics & facts

Development of cases

Due to the accelerated spread of the virus, the Japanese government declared a countrywide state of emergency in April. The government required all citizens to stay home whenever possible and facilities such as restaurants and theaters to temporarily suspend business. The state of emergency was lifted in all 47 prefectures by the end of May, following a decline in the number of new infection cases. The number of new infections per day, however, increased again and peaked in August at close to 1.6 thousand. In November, the infection cases also rose and set a new record high of over 2.5 thousand, possibly indicating a ‘third wave.’

Japan has one of the most rapidly aging demographics in the world, with 28 percent of the population over 65 years old as of 2019. This demography implies a greater vulnerability of the population to COVID-19 because the current global death rate is substantially higher for patients over 60. Despite this, Japan’s death rate has remained relatively low in comparison to Italy, for example, whose proportion of the population over 60 years is also high.

The outbreak of the infectious disease COVID-19 has caused global economic and societal disruptions. The first confirmed case in Japan was reported on January 14, 2020, since then the number of cases rose with three main periods of sharper increases around April, August, and November 2020. As of November 27, the total number of patients diagnosed positive with the virus (SARS-CoV-2) reached 139.5 thousand with a total death toll of 2,051. The total number of patients examined with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was approximately 3.4 million (government laboratory’s) and 3.9 million (National Institute of Infectious Diseases and local institutes for health), respectively.

Development of cases

Due to the accelerated spread of the virus, the Japanese government declared a countrywide state of emergency in April. The government required all citizens to stay home whenever possible and facilities such as restaurants and theaters to temporarily suspend business. The state of emergency was lifted in all 47 prefectures by the end of May, following a decline in the number of new infection cases. The number of new infections per day, however, increased again and peaked in August at close to 1.6 thousand. In November, the infection cases also rose and set a new record high of over 2.5 thousand, possibly indicating a ‘third wave.’

Japan has one of the most rapidly aging demographics in the world, with 28 percent of the population over 65 years old as of 2019. This demography implies a greater vulnerability of the population to COVID-19 because the current global death rate is substantially higher for patients over 60. Despite this, Japan’s death rate has remained relatively low in comparison to Italy, for example, whose proportion of the population over 60 years is also high.

Development of cases

Due to the accelerated spread of the virus, the Japanese government declared a countrywide state of emergency in April. The government required all citizens to stay home whenever possible and facilities such as restaurants and theaters to temporarily suspend business. The state of emergency was lifted in all 47 prefectures by the end of May, following a decline in the number of new infection cases. The number of new infections per day, however, increased again and peaked in August at close to 1.6 thousand. In November, the infection cases also rose and set a new record high of over 2.5 thousand, possibly indicating a ‘third wave.’

Japan has one of the most rapidly aging demographics in the world, with 28 percent of the population over 65 years old as of 2019. This demography implies a greater vulnerability of the population to COVID-19 because the current global death rate is substantially higher for patients over 60. Despite this, Japan’s death rate has remained relatively low in comparison to Italy, for example, whose proportion of the population over 60 years is also high.

Economic impact

The outbreak has not only caused severe ramifications for the health sector and hospitals, but it has also triggered an economic recession in Japan. The losses at the Nikkei Stock Average (Nikkei 225) for March 2020 alone were the worst since the Global Financial Crisis in 2008. In the second quarter of 2020, the real GDP growth rate recorded its sharpest fall in history after WWII of over 28 percent (annualized figure compared to the last quarter), representing the third consecutive quarter with negative growth. Over one thousand publicly listed companies in the country revised their sales revenue since the outbreak of COVID-19 by September 2020, which was a total of roughly 10.2 trillion Japanese yen in losses compared to the initially announced figures. An estimated total of around 13 thousand employees in the manufacturing industry and 10.5 thousand in the foodservice industry were said to be dismissed due to the direct impact of business stagnation resulting from COVID-19. The Japanese stock markets recovered most of its losses by May 2020, but the economic impact on small and midsize companies may be severe in the long term.

On March 24, 2020, the Japanese government announced the postponement of the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games due to the global pandemic situation. The postponement might drastically increase the cost of the Olympic Games, further adding to the pressure on the nation’s economy.

Via https://www.statista.com/topics/6087/coronavirus-disease-covid-19-in-japan/

 

Development of cases

Due to the accelerated spread of the virus, the Japanese government declared a countrywide state of emergency in April. The government required all citizens to stay home whenever possible and facilities such as restaurants and theaters to temporarily suspend business. The state of emergency was lifted in all 47 prefectures by the end of May, following a decline in the number of new infection cases. The number of new infections per day, however, increased again and peaked in August at close to 1.6 thousand. In November, the infection cases also rose and set a new record high of over 2.5 thousand, possibly indicating a ‘third wave.’

Japan has one of the most rapidly aging demographics in the world, with 28 percent of the population over 65 years old as of 2019. This demography implies a greater vulnerability of the population to COVID-19 because the current global death rate is substantially higher for patients over 60. Despite this, Japan’s death rate has remained relatively low in comparison to Italy, for example, whose proportion of the population over 60 years is also high.

Economic impact

The outbreak has not only caused severe ramifications for the health sector and hospitals, but it has also triggered an economic recession in Japan. The losses at the Nikkei Stock Average (Nikkei 225) for March 2020 alone were the worst since the Global Financial Crisis in 2008. In the second quarter of 2020, the real GDP growth rate recorded its sharpest fall in history after WWII of over 28 percent (annualized figure compared to the last quarter), representing the third consecutive quarter with negative growth. Over one thousand publicly listed companies in the country revised their sales revenue since the outbreak of COVID-19 by September 2020, which was a total of roughly 10.2 trillion Japanese yen in losses compared to the initially announced figures. An estimated total of around 13 thousand employees in the manufacturing industry and 10.5 thousand in the foodservice industry were said to be dismissed due to the direct impact of business stagnation resulting from COVID-19. The Japanese stock markets recovered most of its losses by May 2020, but the economic impact on small and midsize companies may be severe in the long term.

On March 24, 2020, the Japanese government announced the postponement of the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games due to the global pandemic situation. The postponement might drastically increase the cost of the Olympic Games, further adding to the pressure on the nation’s economy.